Category: Film Reviews


 

 

Jaya Biswas
 

Film: Luv Ka The End
Director: Bumpy
Cast: Shraddha Kapoor, Taaha Shah, Shenaz Treasuryvala, Pushtiie Shakti, Jannat Zubair Rahmani and Ali Zafar
Rating: Good

Luv Ka The End is all about one crazy night as three girls discover love, life, friendship and more… Now, that’s not something which Yash Raj Films hasn’t tried before. It was attempted earlier in Pyaar Impossible and more. With the new Y-Films coming into picture where the focus is on making films of, for and by the young, one can expect the production house to go full throttle keeping youth in mind.
The story of Luv Ka The End also runs somewhat on the lines of Jaane Tu Ya Jaane Na or Wake Up Sid! in the beginning, with the plot revolving around a gang of girls just out of college, but soon takes a twirl and an interesting one at that.
The film focuses on Rhea (Shraddha Kapoor), who is the quintessential girl next door. She is lovable, cute, lively, vivacious and always dressed in funky clothes that she puts together for herself. Her dream is to watch her favourite rockstar, Freddie Kapoor. Rhea is madly in love with Luv Nanda (Tahaa Shah), the richest and the most popular boy in college. Luv, who so far has been easily befriending almost every hot chick in college, and has even ‘made out’ in the library with a treacher Miss Naaz, now eyes Rhea for a reason. He wants to be the highest scorer at ‘Billionnaire Boys Club’, an online portal that ranks them in the order of their ‘female conquests’. It is Luv’s personal mission to take Rhea’s virginity.
On the eve of her 18th birthday, Luv and Rhea plan to take their relationship to the ‘next level’. Accidentally, Rhea finds out that Luv is not as nice as she thought he was. Rhea decides not to cry but to give it back, in style — to get even and bring Luv Nanda down — and all in the span of one night with the help of her two friends. While most rom-com musicals start with a mushy number, this one is different as it aims to put love to an end.
The song, Tonight by Suman Sridhar is a slow, dreamy number about a young girl in love. Suman has really crooned the song well, effectively capturing the mood. This is followed by the title track of the film Luv Ka The End, sung by Aditi Singh Sharma, which is definitely the second best in the album.
Another interesting fact is debutant director Bumpy’s Hitchcockian screen presence. In almost all of his films, Hitchcock made an appearance much like Bollywood’s showman, Subash Ghai.
Last but not the least, popstar Ali Zafar’s special appearance as Freddie Kapoor adds cherry on the cake. Performancewise, Shraddha Kapoor and Taaha do justice to their roles. However, Pushtiie as Shraddha’s friend is the real show stealer.
Overall, Luv Ka The End is hip and zappy; a fun film worth a watch.

Supreeta Singh

Film: Haunted
Director: Vikram Bhatt
Cast: Mahaakshay, Tia Bajpai, Achint Kaur, Arif Zakaria, Mohan Kapoor, Sanjay Sharma
Rating: Poor

A ghost film is the perfect opportunity for couples to cosy up in a darkened hall. At the first show of Vikram Bhatt’s Haunted, the number of boyfriends and girlfriends that turned up could give fair competition to any public park. But giggling school girls with their teenage lovers seemed to enjoy the antics of the ghost the most. At every shriek, crash and boom, they burst into peals of laughter and settled back into the arms of their boyfriends. Unfortunately, Bhatt himself would not be so amused if he heard the comments that they made. Even without the 3D option, the film is scary for all the wrong reasons.
To be fair, the plot has a twist to it. Haunted by the screams of a young woman, our hero, Rehan (Mahaakshay), goes back 80 years in the past to save the girl from the clutches of an evil professor who tries to rape her, when alive. In his bid to change the destiny of the girl and free her from her sorry state, Rehan must put his own life at risk. Unlike other romantic ghost tales, the story has an unusual end as well. But like most Bollywood films centering on the supernatural, the film turns a turkey.
After giving a stylish and slick film like Raaz that employed scare tactics to its right effects and boasted of hotties like Bipasha Basu and Malini Sharma, Vikram Bhatt has steadily deteriorated in his casting choice. Mahaakshay looks like a kid and consistently carries just one expression throughout the film — whether he is sad, happy, angry or romantic, his facial muscles seem to go on a strike. Tia Bajpai as the victimised girl Meera, should have worked on her appearance. Her plight too fails to arouse pity. Mahaakshay does not look mature enough to shoulder the responsibility of saving a girl and Tia does not look worth saving!
This is largely due to the character of the villainous professor, Iyer (Arif Zakaria) — a lecherous man with an enormous sexual appetite. Just imagine, he traps Tia’s soul when she commits suicide and rapes her for 80-long years! It is torturous to watch a spirit undressing another spirit and deflowering her again and again!
Moreover, the otherwise serene, chiseled and artistic face of Zakaria was hardly suitable for portraying a beastly character.
The background score is jarring and loud. Even the songs are average and do not leave any haunting impression. Bhatt has also unnecessarily dragged the plot. Check the film out only if you have no other place for PDA!

Sohini Dey

Film: Fast And Furious 5
Director: Justin Lin
Cast: Vin Diesel, Dwayne Johnson, Paul Walker, Jordana Brewster
Rating: Average

Fast And Furious 5, the fifth film in the series is a no holds barred action entertainment, full of every masala from hot girls, hotter cars, goofy humour, elaborate chase sequences and ricochetting bullets to camaraderie and family bonding, all in the right proportion.  The lack of an engrossing plot has been compensated by spectacular visuals of car chases and crashes in this Justin Lin directed film which sees a re-union of all the stars from previous films in the same series. After Dominic Toretto (Vin Diesel) is rescued from police custody by his sister Mia (Jordana Brewster) and her ex-FBI agent lover Brian O’Connor (Paul Walker), they decide to plunder the corrupt businessman Hernan Reyes (Joaquim de Almeida) whose path they have crossed. To pull off a $100 million heist, they round up a team of sleek and stylish criminals who, in between chalking out the plan and rehearsing it keep the quotient of entertainment high by prattling enthusiastically. Obstacles to the task are two. For one, Reyes has locked his wealth up in a safe in the police station and secondly, DSS special agent Luke Hobbs (Dwayne Johnson), who is equivalent to an entire police force, is after Dom and his gang.
The stunts performed are entertaining no doubt, with some heart-in-your-mouth moments, but seem too convenient to be plausible. Take for instance the final chase scene where Dom’s and Brian’s cars drag the humongous safe along crowded roads manoeuvring the safe itself to smash enemy cars into smithereens. But you know it’s an action film and you know how it will end, so after a point of time you stop worrying about the truth value of whatever’s shown on the giant silver screen. Somehow you don’t even mind the predictability of it all and lie back and enjoy.
Everybody plays their parts well. Malleability is not a trait Diesel’s face is famous for, but in a film that requires him to display only three emotions at the most, and a lot of his rippling muscles, he is perfect. The same holds for Dwayne Johnson. But the physical and behavioural similarities between the two in the form of a chiseled body, shiny bald pate and steely determination make the chaser and the chased two sides of the same coin.
Apart from the unexplained bit about Vince’s betrayal and return, there are a couple of questions the film raises — Is the huskiness of a mafia lord like corrupt businessman’s voice an acquired trait or a pre-requisite for the role? Is the impending birth of a child in the family the only incident that can swerve criminals by choice off the path of crime?

Shauli Chakraborty

Film: Bidehir Khonje Rabindranath
Director: Sanghamitra Chowdhury
Cast: Abhishek Chatterjee, Arpita Mukherjee, Angshuman
Rating: Average

This year being Rabindranath Tagore’s 150th birth anniversary, a lot of people have decided to commemorate the occasion in different ways. Filmmaker Sanghamitra Chowdhury too has, in her own way, paid tribute to Tagore through this film.
Sanghamitra explores Tagore’s grief after suffering various personal losses. He saw the deaths of Notun Bouthan Kadambari Debi, his wife Mrinalini Debi, his daughter Madhurilata and son Samindranath. Tagore is said to have attempted planchets in order to reach out to the souls of the departed.
It is a film within a film. Jeet (Abhishek) is a filmmaker who is planning a documentary on Tagore. He loves Bolpur and makes it a point to visit Santiniketan whenever he can. Jeet’s brother has a gang of friends who think this is the perfect opportunity for a weekend getaway and convince Jeet to let them accompany him to Bolpur. Like most youngsters these people know very little about Tagore and are on a constant lookout for opportunities to dope and booze and show very little respect for all things Rabindrik. How Jeet deals with this bunch and manages to shoot his film is for you to find out!
The music is heartwarming and soulful. In fact, it is the music which keeps much of the film afloat. There is a tribal dance sequence that has been shot in Bolpur and is pure delight to watch.
As far as performances are concerned Abhishek Chakraborty alone is worth a watch. None of the other actors manage to make an impression. From body language to fake accents — nothing seems to work for this motley crowd, most of whom are first timers. They seriously need to attend grooming classes before attempting another celluloid appearance.
The film deals mostly with Tagore’s dealings with the supernatural and the kind of impact those episodes had on his life. It is more of a docu-feature than a full fledged documentary. However, editing is poor and a number of scenes could have been easily done away with.
This is not a great film – as the filmmaker has acknowledged herself. But this is
definitely a positive beginning. We hope such films encourage other filmmakers, old and new, to make more documentaries on Tagore and other greats
as well!

Film: Just Go With It
Director: Dennis Dugan
Cast: Adam Sandler, Jennifer Aniston, Brooklyn Decker, Nicole Kidman
Rating: Average

Imagine how wonderful or awful it feels, depending on which film industry you swear by, to see a Hollywood romantic comedy being ‘inspired’ by a Bollywood one. Remember Maine Pyar Kyun Kiya, a romantic comedy starring Salman Khan, Sushmita Sen and Katrina Kaif, where Salman plays the doctor falling for the much younger bimbette Katrina and Sushmita plays the assistant who has to pose as his soon to be divorced wife- well, Just Go with It is a little less complicated and a lot more sexed-up version of the same. That’s what should strike the audience who don’t know that the Hindi film itself was ‘inspired’ by the 1969 comedy Cactus Flower. So there, illusions put to rest, let us proceed with the story.
Adam Sandler is a huge-nosed would-be cardiologist simpleton Danny Maccabee, who turns smart and sly, becomes a plastic surgeon and gets his nose in shape, after discovering that his is a marriage of convenience for his scheming bride. But the ring remains on his finger, drawing sympathy and favours of a physical nature alike, at the expense of an imaginary adulterous and shrewish wife, till he meets the right girl (Brooklyn Decker). To marry her he needs a divorce and to get a divorce he needs a wife. His long-time assistant plain-Jane Katherine (Jennifer Aniston) comes to the rescue. A regular comedy of errors ensue and yards of yarns are spun till a praise-each-other session and a passionate Hula dance competition brings the truth out.
Adam Sandler is the perfect choice for a role he has played so many times before that by now it must be difficult playing anything else. Brooklyn Dekker in spite of all her prettiness is bland as the good and kind-hearted girlfriend. One wishes her character wasn’t this flat. Jennifer Aniston clearly carries the film forward with her natural smartness and sparkling eyes. She does the ugly-duckling turning beautiful swan act gracefully but every now and then you spot good ol’ Rachel peeking out of the screen. It is no surprise that Nicole Kidman makes her presence felt even in a cameo. Bailee Madison and Griffin Gluck are adorable kids, the former playing the role of a precocious little girl with elan.
Though the concept is cliché, there are some genuinely funny moments. However, most jokes are discriminatory, in bad taste and at the expense of people who have undergone and are suffering from the negative effects of plastic surgery. Sometimes the jokes and the acts, especially the ones by Nick Swardson are so gross that they are anything but funny. There is no chemistry whatsoever between Sandler and Brooklyn, but he and Aniston make a very warm, cute couple, past their prime. The comfort between the two that seems to reflect in the camaraderie they share on screen easily makes the film a one-time watch. — SD

Jaya Biswas

 
Film: Thank You
Director: Anees Bazmee
Cast: Akshay Kumar, Bobby Deol, Suniel Shetty, Irrfan Khan, Sonam Kapoor, Celina Jaitley, Rimi Sen
Rating: Average

Men hate him, women simply adore him. Anees Bazmee’s latest film, Thank You, sees Akshay Kumar playing a detective who specialises in extra-marital relationships. Akki tells heartbroken wives about their promiscuous husbands, enlightens them with signs of a cheating man and how to catch him red-handed. He educates women and makes them wiser. Well, now you know why!
The basic premise of the plot dwells on ‘Men are dogs’ and ‘Women are dumb’ philosophies. Raj (Bobby Deol), Vikram (Irrfan Khan) and Yogi (Suniel Shetty) are three married men trying to have some fun outside their marriage. Sanjana (Sonam Kapoor), Karthika (Rimi Sen) and Radha (Celina Jaitley) play their lovely wives.
All seems to go well until Sanjana senses something fishy about her hubby’s smooth-going life. On Karthika and Radha’s suggestions, Sanjana hires the perpetually flute-playing private detective Kishan (Akshay Kumar), who promises to teach the three philandering husbands a lesson that they’ll never forget. Sounds familiar? Thank You, sadly, comes across as a not-so-appealing concoction of erstwhile releases like Shaadi No. 1, Biwi No. 1, Masti et al. But most prominently, it is hugely inspired by Bazmee’s own film, No Entry.
While nothing significant happens in the first half, the storyline gets slightly better post interval. But just when you feel the end credits are about to roll, it starts stretching like a chewing gum with Raj’s ‘realisation’ phase in focus. That’s not all. It’s followed by an unnecessary and predictable flashback of Akshay and his wife played by Vidya Balan.
Pritam’s music is uninspiring except for Mika’s Pyaar do Pyaar lo number (from Jaanbaaz-1986), which is already climbing the music charts. The song sounds more like a remix and looks very much like trying a re-do of Apni To Jaise Taise from Housefull.
Akshay delivers an average performance; he does nothing that we haven’t seen him do before. One wonders if Akki doesn’t get tired of playing clichéd roles. Irrfan Khan is simply brilliant with his superb comic timing. Suniel Shetty’s character seems an extension of Hera Pheri. Bobby Deol is decent. As far as the leading women are concerned, Rimi Sen is good but not very different from what she did in Dhoom, Sonam Kapoor looks the prettiest of all. But that’s about it. As far as performance is concerned, this is certainly not one of her best performances. Celina Jaitley doesn’t really stand a chance as she remains absent most of the time. Mallika Sherawat with her item number fails to tickle you.
Annes Bazmee should perhaps say “I’m sorry” for directing Thank You. Watch it for Irrfan, if you must.

Sayandeb Chowdhury

 

 

Film: 7 Khoon Maaf
Director: Vishal Bhradwaj
Cast: Priyanka Chopra, John Abraham, Neil Nitin Mukesh, Naseruddin Shah, Irrfan Khan, Anu Kapoor, Usha Uthup, Aleksandr Dyachenko, Ruskin Bond, Vivaan Shah and Konkona
Rating: Excellent

Vishal Bhardwaj made Maqbool. And that was it. A new school of cinema was born in Bombay. Cinema that was tough, unrelenting, atmospheric, harsh and full of power. In case of Maqbool, and its successor Omkara, the author was none other than William Shakespeare (Macbeth, Othello). By the time he reached Kaminey, Bhardwaj had already acquired a kind of an unsparing vision of a life and its assorted idiosyncrasies that he had harnessed to remarkable effect. Kaminey, the gangster movie about Mumbai underworld and the horse racing mafia was but cool. In 7 Khoon Maaf, Bhardwaj manages to pull his aces together to create what is perhaps most Shakespearean of his films. In what is a virtuoso adaptation of Ruskin Bond short story Susanna’s Seven Husbands, Bhardwaj shows how he has internalised the Shakespearean eye for the imminent and the immanent, to what beauty he can build an atmosphere of genuine suspense even in the everyday, how premonition and clairvoyance resides in ordinary acts of human kindness and insight. And most importantly how behind chilling acts of crime are often the most tragic and lonely of human beings who are otherwise pilgrims of love.
Priyanka Chopra in what is an author backed role plays Susanna to almost perfect effect, falling for love every time when actually there was none. She lives and breathes her role as a love-seeking, vulnerable woman, who gets accosted by and seduced by six brazen men, who turn out to be different from who they were supposed to be. Her vulnerability is however her biggest weapon in her troubled life and as she grows old, she learns to use them more effectively than ever before. And like any woman who has passed not once but six times, alone, through the territory of impertinent men, she learns to use the craft of her sexuality too, even as her bones and skin turn thicker and thicker under her beauteous, if wrinkled skin. 
The story moves fast and uncontrollably towards its denouement, which is nothing short of revelatory. On the way, Priyanka changes her religion twice, visits Kashmir and Pondicherry, get’s married to a Russian attaché and a Bengali doctor apart from a Rajput rockstar, a Goanese General with one leg and a UP police inspector. Her milieu changes from the brazenly feudal world of the landed military, to that of an Urdu poet with special affection for sadomasochism, from the heroin-induced world of skirted rock singers of early eighties Goa to that of naturopathy of a bankrupt doctor. Her only witness and confidante is the narrator, Arun, who remains the distant young lover and the only normative influence in her mad life, perhaps the only one who could have survived her audacious search for love in a battered human landscape that includes her husband and her band of murdering minsters.
The film’s premise and period moves from the swinging ‘70s to 26/11 and beyond and the details are brought out with total attention and care. Ranjan Palit’s superlative, atmospheric photography is the highpoint of the film, apart from, of course, Bhardwaj’s superb ear for music which includes a rock ballad, a sufi lovenote and of course the Russian folk inspired Darrling, which remains the film’s chartbusting number. 
7 Khoon Maaf is vintage Vishal Bhardwaj, sensible, sensitive, powerful and sparsely illuminating of the darkness that we all carry inside.

 

 

Jaya Biswas

 

 

Film: Dhobi Ghat – Mumbai Diaries
Cast: Aamir Khan, Monica Dogra, Prateik, Kriti Malhotra
Director: Kiran Rao
Rating: Good

That there is no interval in Dhobi Ghat… is good, for all the right reasons. You don’t really want to take a break expecting something more spectacular to happen. ‘Mumbai Diaries’, as debutante director Kiran Rao puts it, is just apt as the tagline. Watching it is like flipping through the pages of a diary. Rao’s film is indeed a loving tribute to Mumbai in all its teeming vitality.
Dhobi Ghat is not a film where you walk in expecting regular entertainment. It is a take on Mumbai; the city with its hustle and bustle and enough place for all its immigrants. It is about the sea that listens to your story, absorbs and keeps all your secrets — which becomes the ‘Mumbai Diaries’. With its key settings in crowded, largely old, congested yet beguiling portions of this city, it is like a rich embroidery, which interweaves the intersecting lives of four people.
The film actually marks a subtle and assured debut for writer-director Rao and its radiant leading lady, a rock star and stage performer Monica Dogra.
Arun (Aamir Khan) plays a painter, a man who is fond of his own space. A loner by choice, Arun is a divorcee who is constantly moving from one home to another in quest of something. He bumps into Shai (Monica Dogra) an investment banker at his painting exhibition and they have a one-night stand. Later, he tries to absolve himself from guilt and blames it on his drink, saying that he never meant commitment. Meanwhile, in the process of shifting houses, he finds a video of the former tenant. As he plays the videos, Arun is unconsciously drawn towards Yasmin Noor’s (Kriti Malhotra) story as he tries to paint something of what he understands from it. Though he tries to be indifferent, the video leaves him devastated.
The film has three heroes — Tushar Kanti Ray, the cinematographer, Gustavo Santaolalla, who provides the background sound and Prateik who shines through in every possible scene. As Munna, a young, good-looking washerman who dreams of becoming a Bollywood actor, Prateik offers an incredibly funny yet sensitive performance. This not being a marquee Aamir Khan film, the other three characters share fair screen time and it’s Prateik who ultimately emerges a hero in the true sense of the term. As a brooding painter, Aamir underplays his character as required. Newcomer Monica Dogra as Shai, fits the bill with her broken Hindi dialogues. Though we see Kriti Malhotra’s character far less than Dogra’s, her performance as a docile, naïve young wife is compelling.
The only drawback is the script or the lack of it. Albeit the film boasts of a few touching moments beautifully captured, absence of a powerful storyline makes it a tad boring. Perhaps it would be perceived differently by a non-Mumbaikar, but if you’ve lived in the city, even for a while, there ought to be mixed reactions. Either you get a bit nostalgic, raving about the city or get some shut eye. But you certainly wouldn’t want to be reminded how people travel in local trains, why people go to Marine Drive or why The Gateway of India is thronged by click-happy tourists. Haven’t we seen it all before?
Overall, this 95 minutes film is a one-time watch.

Shauli Chakraborty

Film: Takhan Teish
Director: Atanu Ghosh
Cast: Jisshu Sengupta, Indrani Halder, Paoli Dam, Aparijita Ghosh Das, Tanushree Shankar
Rating: Average

There are some filmmakers who want to make good films but lose focus somewhere in between. And there are others who are in complete control all the time. Atanu Ghosh, as far as Takhon Teish is concerned, belongs to the first category. One is taken aback by the casting visuals, put off by the continuous, unnecessary and on-your-face sexual undertones that pop up at regular intervals. By the time the credits roll one is itching to rush for the exit!
The cast is impressive but the script disappoints big time. The film revolves around Jisshu and his confrontations with the four women in his life. They are his mother (Tanushree), his biology teacher (Indrani), his Facebook buddy (Aparajita) and his ultimate fantasy Mohini (Paoli). Jisshu’s portrayal of Tamodeep is good but could have been much better. After Abohoman and Arekti Premer Golpo, the audience is not prepared to accept such mediocre performance from an actor of his calibre. 
Even if Paoli Dam is being touted as one of the most promising actors, her performance in the film raises questioning eyebrows. The lady had serious difficulty in getting into the skin of her character. If her acting in Moner Manush was average, here it is bad. All her characters seem to share a strong family resemblance when it comes to the lovemaking scenes! Aparajita, on the other hand, looks fresh and comes up with a mature act. Indrani is her usual effortless self. We only wish the sylist had managed to find a more suitable wig for her.
One person who deserves special mention is Tanushree Shankar. She plays the possessive yet sophisticated mother to the tee. Hats off to the lady for managing to look like a million bucks even at this stage of her career. Rajatabha Dutta is first rate and Locket Chatterjee makes a mark with her three-minute cameo.
The film, however, needed more editing. Also the dialogues are repetitive and reflect the script writer’s lethargic take on his characters’ imaginations. For example amar ek durshomporker dadu amay dekhe bolechilen, cheleta boro hoye artist hobe nahole baari chere chole jabe (when one of my distant grandfathers saw me he said I would either grow up to be an artist or run away from home) is a prophecy that echoes in Tamodeep’s mind all the time. But the dialogue needn’t have echoed throughout the film. There are numerous other ways to depict resonance. Of course, the choice to use them would have been his but the possibility of boredom should have crossed the mind of the director of Angshumaner Chhobi.
Expectations were high from this film. Sadly, pre-release hype seems to have found more takers than the film itself!

 

 

Diganta Guha

 

 
Film: Turning 30!!!
Director: Alankrita Shrivastava
Cast: Gul Panag, Purab Kohli, Ira Dubey, Jeneva Talwar, Siddharth Makkar, Tilottoma Shome
Rating: Good

 

 

Small and medium budget films have been invading  the front row for a while.  They do not need big stars and neither do they need huge production costs. They have all that in a compact script — that is what makes the film a big hit. And director Prakash Jha has caught the trend right. Alankrita Shrivastava’s Turning 30!!! belongs to that genre of movies. It focuses more on the script and story rather than taking the star value route. Add the entertainment to it and you have a box office hit.
The film traces the journey of Naina (Gul Panag) who is facing a mid-life crisis. The character of Naina evolves along with the movie, of course for the better. As mentioned earlier, the film works because of the screenplay. It has its sad and as well as funny moments and the director weaves them all together to present an interesting two hours.
In the film, Naina is seen as the rough-and-tough kind, who breaks down after splitting up with her boyfriend. However, as the saying goes, whatever happens, happens for the best, a new horizon opens up for her. And that’s where the film has its best moments. The sequences between Gul and her friends are memories in the film that you can bring home.
Let’s face it, Turning 30!!! is a modern film. And it definitely has all the ingredients of an entertainer. Yet, it creeps into the hearts of today’s girls who struggle to cement their place in this age. The language of the film Hinglish is more English than Hindi. Well, no surprises there, that’s what today’s dialect is and the films are just keeping pace with it.
A word on Gul without whom the film would have been incomplete. Nobody else could have portrayed Naina better than Gul who essays the character with elan. Add to it, her body language and the emotional turbulence she showcases, she absolutely captures your imagination.
In some of her sequences, thanks to the costume designer, Poornamrata Singh, Gul looked stunning.
Purab Kohli who plays The cry-on-my-shoulders kinds, has been impressive in the film.
A chick-flick targetted at the multiplex audience, the film’s future depends a lot on word-of-mouth publicity. Let’s keep our fingers crossed

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