Jaya Biswas

Film: Break Ke Baad
Cast: Deepika Padukone, Imran Khan, Sharmila Tagore, Shahana Goswami, Yudishtir Urs, Lilette Dubey, Naveen Nischol
Director: Danish Aslam
Rating: Poor
 
Break Ke Baad, co-written and directed by debutant Danish Aslam starts off well. Over a long title sequence a la Main Hoon Na, we are introduced to the lead characters — Abhay, played by Imran Khan and Aaliya, played by Deepika Padukone — both Hindi film buffs who share their first kiss while watching Kuch Kuch Hota Hai. The first hour-and-a-half goes off like a breeze. But that’s about it.
Imran Khan re-enacts a character he’s essayed quite effectively in Jaane Tu…Ya Jaane Na. Here too, Abhay Gulati is a chocolate-faced epitome of patience. He is sensitive; the quintessential Mr Right putting up with his insolent, spoilt, self-centred childhood sweetheart, Aaliya. Imran is charming, but his character — that’s supposed to manipulate the audience into agreeing with him —doesn’t quite work.
Aaliya, who aspires to be an actress, calls her mom (Sharmila Tagore) by her first-name. She’s smart and manipulative who knows how to work her way to get what she wants. Aaliya’s ambition to follow her passion has everyone tied up in knots. Abhay’s mental conflict of working in his father’s business, despite hating it forms another angle to the story. So far, so good. 
Danish has tried too hard to be cool but the effort is glaring. The film’s weak foundation and lack of fun moments make it tedious. The concept of breaks-ups and relationships have been dealt with in far  more mature way in Love Aaj Kal (also starring Deepika Padukone), where the film starts with a break-up and then goes on to focus on the metamorphosis of the couple meeting new people, and so on. At least, it was entertaining, and the conflict in the film proceeded with ease.
The second half, where Aaliya enjoys her time at the university, making new friends and her over-protective boyfriend follows her to woo her back is too much to handle. Tired of a claustrophobic relationship, Aaliya wants space and a break-up! Abhay on the other hand disagrees.
The two friends (Shahana Goswami and Yudishtir) — the owners of the house where both Aaliya and Abhay put up in Australia, are just okay.
There is an overload of content advertising (Kit Kat chocolates, Volkswagen Beetle, Zen mobile). Nothwithstanding the mandatory big, fat Punjabi wedding, clips incorporated from Bollywood rom-coms like DDLJ, Kuch Kuch Hota Hai and other films, Aslam maintains a mellow vibe and concentrates on establishing the close friendship between Abhay (Imran Khan) and Aaliya (Deepika Padukone). And thank god for small mercies, their Hindu-Muslim status is never a subject of concern or speculation here.
It’s always nice to see veterans like Sharmila Tagore and Naveen Nischol lending some warmth to the otherwise insipid surroundings.
Lillete Dubey, as the coquettish single aunt with her tongue-in-cheek repartees, is too good.
The storytelling is superfluous, barely scratches the surface of the characters’ conflicts, preferring not to delve deeper and is unconvincingly served to the audience.
Watch it if you haven’t had enough of rom-coms already.

ALSO READ:

REVIEW: Watch it for Ranbir-Priyanka’s awesome chemistry

Advertisements